History

The Faces of Earth was opened in Amherst, Massachusetts in 1971 by Steve Vogel and Peter Gezork. The building was an old bowling alley, the store was a mix of clothing boutique, gift shop, record store, and head shop all rolled into one. It was a favorite of locals, students, and pretty much everyone. 

The store developed an early reputation for being the place you could find just about anything, and quickly won over the hearts of devoted customers, who still shop with us today!

In 1986, Faces opened a second location in Northampton, Massachusetts, in a large building that had previously housed J. J. Newberry's Department Store. 

Faces in Amherst closed in 1991, based on the growing success of the Northampton location. Then in 1994 the Northampton store renovated the building's basement to add a second level of retail space. The layout of the store has changed many times since then, this fluidity is one reason why the Faces shopping experience is so unique. 

In 2009, Steve Vogel passed the reins to his son, Peter Vogel. He continued the store's tradition of retail as a form of entertainment, making the customer experience the top priority and seeking out fun and unique items to make people happy. He believed that at Faces, you should be yourself, a philosophy that still continues today.

In 2015, Peter announced that the store would be closing unless a new owner could be found. A public outcry followed this statement, and fans and customers from all over the country voiced their support and sadness that their favorite quirky store would be no more. 

All was not lost, however, and our new owners Therese and Daniel McCarthy could not be more pleased to be continuing the Faces tradition. Both grew up as Faces customers, and are committed to the values that the store was built on. 

At Faces we have fun. Come laugh with us, hang out with your friends, dance along to the music, and be yourself!

Promotional drawing of the original Faces of Earth in Amherst, Massachusetts, September 5, 1972 UMASS Daily Collegian